The Most Common Types of Lawyers

The 5 Most Common Types of Lawyers

Not all lawyers are the same.  Not only are some lawyers and law firms better than others but not all lawyers can represent a crime or issue.  Estate lawyers can’t represent a client accused of domestic abuse and a criminal defense attorney can’t draft a will.  We’ve compiled a list of the most common types of lawyers and attorneys.

The Most Common Types of Lawyers
The Most Common Types of Lawyers

Personal Injury Lawyer

Personal injury lawyers represent clients who have been injured or involved in accidents.  Personal injury lawyers work to earn clients compensation from individuals or organizations.  Common injuries that personal injury attorneys are called upon to represent clients include car accidents, misdiagnosed illness, or workplace injuries.  Personal injury lawyers take a pre-determined percentage of any compensation won as a result of their representation in court.

Real Estate Lawyers
Real Estate Lawyers

Estate Lawyer

Most families or individuals will hire an estate lawyer.  Estate lawyers organize an individual’s or household’s assets prior to death or critical injury.  College trusts and wills are drafted by estate lawyers.

Divorce Lawyers
Divorce Lawyers

Divorce Lawyers

Each party in a divorce will end up calling upon a divorce lawyer.  Divorce lawyer’s main priority is to get their client the most assets possible.  Occasionally, divorce lawyers not only work towards getting assets but also custody of children.

Criminal Defense Lawyers
Criminal Defense Lawyers

Criminal Defense Lawyers

Criminal defense lawyers or criminal defense attorneys represent those who have been wrongly convicted of a crime.  Crimes include drug-related violations, domestic abuse, murder, assault, and federal crimes. The main goal criminal defense attorneys work toward is a not guilty verdict or the least amount of jail time or fines possible.

Business Lawyers
Business Lawyers

Corporate Lawyers

Corporate lawyers deal with a variety of issues.  These issues can range from mergers to working with unions.  On the business side of things, corporate lawyers work on forming companies, acquiring other companies, and mergers.  On the employee side, corporate lawyers will work with individual employees or unions.